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bidding wars

7 Times to Offer Over Asking Price on a House—or Else You May Lose Out

May 6, 2019

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Offering over asking price on a house often makes buyers wince. But let’s face it, paying above list price is just a reality in certain circumstances—at least if you really have any hopes of getting that house!

So when exactly should you aim high and offer over asking? Check for these signs below that suggest this pricey move is essential.

1. It’s a seller’s market

A seller’s market is when there are more home buyers than sellers—meaning demand outpaces the supply of homes for sale. As a result, home buyers in a seller’s market face a tough challenge: Due to increased competition, they often have to act fast and bid high to woo sellers into accepting their offer, says Seth Lejeune, a real estate agent with Berkshire Hathaway in Malvern, PA.

Looking at a couple of key factors can help you determine whether you’re in a seller’s market, Lejeune says, starting with the average days on market.

A good rule of thumb: “If houses are selling in your neighborhood in less than 10 days, it’s a strong seller’s market,” Lejeune says. You can find what the average days on market is in your city using realtor.com’s Local Market Trends tool.

You’ll also want to evaluate what homes are selling for compared with their list price. In a strong seller’s market, Lejeune says, the final sales price is typically at least 10% higher than the asking price. (Your real estate agent can pull this data for you.)

2. You know, for a fact, you’re going up against other offers

Bidding wars can erupt, even in a buyer’s market—sometimes all it takes is an aggressively priced home, which is why it’s important to find out whether there are other bids on a property before you make an offer. So go ahead and ask (or have your real estate agent ask on you behalf); generally it’s in their interests to say if other offers are on the table since it might spur you to act fast.

3. The house is blatantly underpriced

Some sellers decide to list their home well below the property’s fair market value in an effort to spark a bidding war. In that instance, it may make sense for you to offer over asking price in order for your bid to outshine other offers.

To figure out if a house is underpriced, you and your agent should assess recently sold homes in the area (also known as comparables, or “comps”). This will give you a baseline that you can use to calculate a home’s true market value, which you can use as a benchmark when pricing your offer.

4. You’re competing with cash buyers

Home sellers swoon over all-cash offers for one simple reason: It means there’s no doubt that you’ve got the coin to close the deal. Consequently, all-cash home buyers have a distinct advantage over those who need a mortgage, because there’s no guarantee that lenders will fork over the money.

Cash offers made up 29% of single-family home and condo sales in 2017, according to ATTOM Data Solutions. So, if you know you’re competing against one, making a bid that’s over a home’s list price could persuade the seller to accept your offer.

5. The seller isn’t motivated

Some home sellers have to unload their house as quickly as possible, say, due to an imminent relocation for a new job or a need to raise cash to purchase their next home. Other sellers, though, aren’t quite as motivated—and they may just be listing their house to “test the market” and see what sized offer they can get, which is why it’s important to ascertain what the seller’s motivations are, says Diana George, founder of Vault Realty Group, in Oakland, CA.

“I always call the real estate listing agent and speak to them directly to get a better understanding as to what’s driving the seller,” George says.

If you find yourself dealing with an unmotivated seller, offering above the home’s list price could make the seller bite. The caveat, of course, is you don’t want to offer so much above asking price to the point where you significantly overpay for the home.

6. You absolutely adore the home—and can’t risk losing it

Sometimes buyers simply fall head over feels for a house, says Chris Dossman, a real estate agent with Century 21 Scheetz in Indianapolis. If you find a house and feel your heart would be broken if you lose it, offering over asking price can help you lock down the property, Dossman says.

7. You can afford to pay over asking price

One word of warning: If you’re obtaining a mortgage, be aware that if you pay way over what a home is really worth, the home still has to pass appraisal in order for your lender to provide you with the loan that you need. Any difference between a home’s appraised value and your contract price would have to come out of your pocket. As always, you’ll want to rely on your real estate agent to help you craft a winning offer you can afford.

The post 7 Times to Offer Over Asking Price on a House—or Else You May Lose Out appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

6 Things You’ll Love—and Hate—About Buying a Home This Spring

March 20, 2019

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Welcome to the best—and worst—time to buy a home: spring! Yes, it’s peak home-buying season. However, it’s no bed of roses.

Knowing what to expect is half the battle, and can help you use these highs and lows to your advantage!

So consider this an essential prep course. Ready to dive into the best of times and the worst of times for home buying?

You’ll love: All the inventory

One of the best things about buying a house during the spring is that you have a lot more options to choose from.

“New listings tend to flood the market in April and May,” says Kimberly Sands, a real estate broker in Carolina Beach, NC. Just keep in mind that with so much inventory out there, you’ll want to make sure to stick to your search and price parameters to avoid getting overwhelmed.

You’ll hate: All the competition

Busier times mean more buyers and, thus, more competition—which explains why bidding wars are more common during the spring, says Chris Dossman, a real estate agent with Century 21 Scheetz in Indianapolis.

As a result, you have to act fast when the right listing pops up, says Seth Lejeune, a real estate agent with Berkshire Hathaway in Collegeville, PA. Signing up for instant alerts, so you can see homes as soon as they hit the market, can help you stay a step ahead.

That being said, don’t expect a computer to do all the work for you. In hot markets, listings may be scooped up before they are even posted online, which is why most housing experts suggest working with a real estate agent throughout the home-buying process.

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Watch: Buying a Home? Here’s What Real Estate Agents Wish You Knew

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You’ll love: All the open houses

More homes on the market mean more open houses for you to attend. That’s exciting news for buyers who relish ogling homes in person. Going to more open houses means you’ll get a better feel for the neighborhood you’re interested in, while also giving you the opportunity to size up the other home buyers you’re going up against.

But with so many open houses to hit, make sure to plot out on a map the ones you want to see, with the times they’re open, in order to maximize your time.

You’ll hate: The time pressure

Great listings get snatched up quickly year-round, yet home buyers are under even more pressure when there’s more competition among buyers. You have to be prepared to make an offer fast, since indecision could potentially cost you your dream home. That’s why it’s crucial to zero in on what type of home you’re looking to buy and what your price range is before you start seriously looking, Dossman says.

Moreover, you should get pre-approved for a mortgage before you start your home search. Plus, having a letter from a mortgage stating that you’ve been pre-approved for a loan will speak volumes to a home seller, says Linda Sanderfoot, a real estate agent at Coldwell Banker in Neenah, WI.

“Sellers want reassurance that you’ll be able to obtain a home loan,” says Sanderfoot, “otherwise the deal can fall through.”

You’ll love: Shopping in warmer weather

You can breathe a sigh of relief knowing that the season’s warmer weather makes for a more enjoyable house hunting experience. After all, who enjoys trudging through snow or suffering through cold weather to look at houses? No one! Also, clearer skies and warmer temps make for better moving conditions.

You’ll hate: Higher prices

Home buyers generally have more wiggle room to make lowball offers during the slower seasons, since there’s less competition. However, buyers have less negotiating power during the spring. Therefore, “be prepared to pay full list price for a house, assuming it’s been priced at fair market value,” says Lejeune.

Also, if possible, be prepared to offer a seller something that other buyers won’t, such as a longer closing period or a rent-back agreement so that the seller has extra days to move out. This is where having a great buyer’s agent comes in; a savvy agent will talk to a listing agent to find out what the seller is looking for—giving you the ability to make a more attractive bid.

The bottom line

Spring home-buying season has its pros and cons, but by preparing for them you’ll be in a much better position to clinch your dream home. And, if you don’t manage to buy a house this spring, summer is still a great time to buy a house, too.

The post 6 Things You’ll Love—and Hate—About Buying a Home This Spring appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

5 Big Reasons to Sell Your Home This Year (Because It Could Get Tougher)

February 20, 2019

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It’s no secret that life’s been pretty good to sellers for the past several years. Even if you had no need—or desire—to move, the housing landscape might have seriously tempted you to put your house on the market anyway. After all, it’s hard not to see visions of dollar signs when your neighbors are unloading their homes for tens of thousands over asking price.

But as they say, all good things must come to an end. And you’ve probably heard that the white-hot housing market of years past is finally beginning to cool.

So if you haven’t listed your home before now, did you miss the boat? Absolutely not. But with each passing month, the experts say, you can expect the housing climate to shift a bit more in buyers’ favor.

“It’s definitely still a seller’s market in most of the country. But it’s not the same seller’s market that you saw in the last couple of years,” says Danielle Hale, chief economist of realtor.com®. “You might have to think about how your home compares to the competition that buyers are going to see when they’re shopping. And you might have to price a little bit more competitively, or think about other enticements to attract buyers.”

There’s still a chance to cash in for top dollar, though, if you move quickly. Here are the biggest reasons to sell ASAP in 2019.

1. You won’t be the only listing for long

The top reason sellers have been in the catbird seat for the past several years? Inventory. There simply weren’t enough homes on the market to keep up with buyer demand. And when a “For Sale” sign did go up, you can bet a bidding war would soon follow.

“You might have been the only listing in your neighborhood, and you could put your home up at a certain list price and you would be likely to see multiple offers at or above that list price,” Hale explains.

That tide is turning this year, Hale says. That’s because the number of homes for sale is finally increasing, albeit slowly. For now, buyers still outnumber inventory. But if you’re thinking about selling and don’t want to compete with your neighbors, it’ll pay off (literally) to list earlier rather than later. (This is particularly true in pricier markets, where inventory is increasing at a faster rate than more affordable areas.)

“It’s going to depend on what neighborhood you’re in, but we expect it to be more common this year that you won’t be the only listing,” Hale says.

2. You still stand to make a ‘handsome profit’

Home prices have been on a meteoric rise for the past seven years. In January 2012, the U.S. median home price was $154,700. Today, that figure has nearly doubled—to $289,300—and sellers have rejoiced.

Now comes a twist: 15% of all home listings saw price cuts in January, according to realtor.com data.

That might sound like bad news if you’re thinking of selling. But hear us out: Those moderating prices, combined with today’s mortgage rates (more on that below), mean increased buyer demand for your house.

Plus, it’s not that home prices aren’t still increasing—they’re just not increasing at the frenzied pace of previous years, which often featured multiple offers at or above asking price, Hale says. So even though you might have some more competition as a seller, things are still looking pretty sweet for you when it comes to cold, hard cash.

“Even if you don’t get an offer above your asking price, you’re probably still going to come away with a handsome profit from being a seller in 2019,” Hale says.

But again, it’ll pay to put your home on the market as soon as you can—before conditions change.

“Sellers who list their homes earlier in the year tend to get a higher sales price, often above list, and shorter days on market,” says Ali Wolf, director of economic research at Meyers Research.

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Watch: This Totally Ordinary House Sold for $782K Over Asking (Yes, You Read That Right)

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3. There’s high demand for homes under $300K

There’s more good news if you own a home below the national median price of $289,300. Not only is that inventory increasing at a slower rate than its luxury counterparts, but there are more buyers shopping at those price points.

“If you’re a below-median-price seller, you will see a seller’s market that is as good as what you saw in previous years—maybe even better,” Hale says. “You might still see multiple offers coming in quickly, maybe even above asking price.”

4. Mortgage rates are at a new low

Something strange has been happening over the past few months. Experts predicted mortgage rates would rise—and at the end of 2018, they were indeed ticking upward as expected.

But since the start of the year, rates on a 30-year fixed mortgage (the most popular home loan) have been falling, sliding last week to a new 12-month low of 4.37%. And of course, those historically low mortgage rates mean you stand to have more buyers knocking on your door.

Plus, this temporary dip in rates creates an opportunity for trade-up buyers as well. After all, if you’re selling your home, there’s a good chance you’ll need to buy another one.

Bottom line: Now’s the time to hustle and get both transactions done.

“Sellers need to take advantage of low rates as much as buyers do,” Wolf says. “Sellers don’t want to get stuck in their homes when rates go up and the math no longer makes sense to move.”

5. Millennials are flooding the market

Historically speaking, people tend to buy their first home around age 30. And guess what? We’ve got a whole bunch of people turning 30 in the next two years—nearly 5 million, in fact, according to realtor.com data. So you can count on those millennials to be a driving force in the housing market.

“Millennials want to own a home as much as prior generations,” Wolf says. “We saw millennial shoppers scooping up homes in 2018—and 2019 will be no different.”

What’s more, Hale adds, is that you won’t just be seeing demand from first-time buyers. Older millennials in their middle to late 30s have already owned a home for a few years, and could be looking at now as a prime time to trade up.

“From a seller’s perspective, you’re going to have possibly more interested buyers,” Hale says. “So that’s motivation to put your house on the market.”

The post 5 Big Reasons to Sell Your Home This Year (Because It Could Get Tougher) appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.